Kimchi For Weight Loss?

Kimchi For Weight Loss?


Kimchi For Weight Loss?

Posted: 20 Apr 2015 05:00 AM PDT

kimchiDisclaimer: no actual weight was lost in this study! Nevertheless, according to a Han Kyungsun and colleagues, in a paper published in Molecular Nutrition and Food Research, daily ingestion of fermented (but not unfermented) kimchi may result in a potentially beneficial change in the gut bacteriome profile with changes in the expression of multiple metabolic pathways (at least in circulating blood cells).

This study on 8-weeks of fermented vs. unfermented kimchi in 24 women with obesity, was prompted by the widely held assumption that fermented preserves (e.g. kimchi, sauerkraut, etc.) can have positive metabolic effects and has optimistically been linked to weight loss (although evidence for this is rather anecdotal at best).

Be that as it may, the fact that the researchers did find an effect on the relationship of firmicutes to bacteroides populations in the gut at least demonstrates that fermented foods (in this case kimchi) can indeed have a significant on gut bacteria.

How and if this results in any clinically relevant metabolic changes remains to be seen.

@DrSharma
Gurgaon, India

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Obesity Weekend Roundup, April 17, 2015

Obesity Weekend Roundup, April 17, 2015


Obesity Weekend Roundup, April 17, 2015

Posted: 19 Apr 2015 05:00 AM PDT

As not everyone may have a chance during the week to read every post, here’s a roundup of last week’s posts:

Have a great Sunday! (or what is left of it)

@DrSharma
Frankfurt, Germany

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Epode’s Canada Obesity Forum

Epode’s Canada Obesity Forum


Epode’s Canada Obesity Forum

Posted: 17 Apr 2015 05:00 AM PDT

Epode canadaAs part of the 4th Canadian Obesity SummitEPODE Canada presents its first Canadian Regional Forum. This one-day workshop is designed for program managers, local community coordinators or program advisors of childhood obesity prevention programs, and to share knowledge and practical advice between EPODE and Canadian programs.

Senior members of the EPODE global team including program managers from programs in Belgium and the Netherlands will share their practical experience on program design, social marketing actions, private public partnerships and program evaluation. Canadian program managers will report on their experience and learnings and discuss barriers and levers to working in the Canadian context. A special workshop on program evaluation, chaired by Dr. Emile Levy of Hospital St. Justine in Montreal will discuss practical approaches to evaluating process and outcomes. A special luncheon presentation on kids and nutrition will be given by the founders of Real Foods for Real Kids. A networking event will be held afterwards for more informal discussion or questions. By attending this landmark event you will find ideas that can help you improve the efficiency and effectiveness of your childhood obesity prevention program.

The cost of the full day workshop includes lunch and the networking event. Attendees can choose to attend only the EPODE Canada workshop or to continue on with the full Summit program and presentations. Program members of the EPODE International Network may attend at a significantly reduced rate.

Learning objectives:

Through these presentations and workshops, participants will learn to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of a community-based childhood obesity prevention program by learning:

  1. The 23 year evolution of the EPODE methodology and its critical success factors. e.g. the four pillars.
  2. Best practices from community-based programs around the world in program design, social marketing actions, private public partnershipsand program evaluation methodologies.
  3. Valuable insights into barriers and opportunities in the Canadian context via experts in the field presenting their findings and experience.
  4. Participants will share knowledge with other similar programs, and become part of a Canada-wide network of childhood obesity prevention programs.

Who should attend:

Anyone interested in improving the efficiency and effectiveness of implementing a childhood obesity prevention programs. This includes:

    • program managers
    • local community coordinators
    • program advisors (academics, health care professionals) of childhood obesity prevention programs

Topics include:

See a full list of topics in our schedule (as of January 19th 2015).

Registration (ends April 28, 2015)

Members of EPODE Canada and the Canadian Obesity Summit receive discounts on registration! Become a member of the EPODE International Network today!

General – $350

EPODE Network members- $225

Registration is now open!  

@DrSharma
Edmonton, AB

 

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Epigenetic Obesity In The Fruit Fly

Epigenetic Obesity In The Fruit Fly


Epigenetic Obesity In The Fruit Fly

Posted: 16 Apr 2015 05:00 AM PDT

sharma-obesity-drosophila1Regular readers are well aware of the considerable evidence now supporting the notion that inter-generational transmission of obesity risk through epigenetic modification may well be a key factor in the recent global rise in obesity rates (over the past 100 years or so).

Now a brief review article by Susan Ozanne from the University of Cambridge, UK, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, describes how researchers have now identified a clear and conserved epigenetic signature that is associated with obesity across species (from the fruit fly all the way to humans).

The article discusses how the transmission of susceptibility to obesity can occur as a consequence of "developmental programming," whereby environmental factors (e.g. a high-fat diet) encountered at the point of conception and during fetal and neonatal life can permanently influences the structure, function, and metabolism of key organs in the offsprin, thus leading to an increased risk of diseases such as obesity later in life.

There is now evidence that such intergenerational transmission of disease can occur through environmental manipulation of both the maternal and paternal lines – thus, this is not something that is just a matter of maternal environment.

Thus, as Ozanne points out,

“Epigenetic mechanisms that influence gene expression have been proposed to mediate the effects of both maternal and paternal dietary manipulation on disease susceptibility in the offspring (these mechanisms include alterations in DNA methylation, histone modifications, and the expression of microRNAs).”

Work in the fruit fly has linked the effect of paternal sugar-feeding on the chromatin structure at a specific region of the X chromosome and transcriptome analysis of embryos generated from fathers fed a high-sugar diet, revealed dysregulation of transcripts encoding two proteins (one of them is called Su(var)) known to change chromatin structure and gene regulation.

Subsequent analyses of microarray data sets from humans and mice likewise revealed a depletion of the Su(var) proteins in three data sets from humans and in two data sets from mice.

Thus,

“This finding is consistent with the possibility that the depletion of the Su(var) pathway may be brought about by an environmental insult to the genome that is associated with obesity.”

Not only do these studies provide important insights into just how generational transmission of obesity may work but it may also lead to the development of early tests to determine the susceptibility of individuals to the future development of conditions like obesity or diabetes based on epigenetic signatures.

All of this may be far more relevant for clinical practice than most readers may think – indeed, a focus on maternal (and now paternal?) health as a target to reduce the risk of childhood (and adult) obesity is already underway.

This issue will certainly be a “hot topic” at the Canadian Obesity Summit in Toronto later this month.

@DrSharma
Edmonton, AB

 

 

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What Happens To Patients With Severe Obesity In Hospitals?

What Happens To Patients With Severe Obesity In Hospitals?


What Happens To Patients With Severe Obesity In Hospitals?

Posted: 15 Apr 2015 05:00 AM PDT

With the increasing number of Canadians living with severe obesity (BMIs 50+), it is not unexpected that more of them will be seen in healthcare settings. However, whether or not Canadian hospitals are ready to look after these patients with in the right setting with the right equipment and whether healthcare providers are aware of and sensitive to the special needs of these patients is not clear.… Read More »
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